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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
steps that might keep you from getting the disease? >>> and, live big. one gutsy woman decides to challenge the limits of middle age. her 60-hour nonstop swim with the sharks, a rallying cry for every life. >>> good evening. the 80-year-old global power brok broker rupert murdoch called this the most humble day of his life. and we catched him called to account in front of british parliament, for the scandal that outraged the world. next to him, the son he h h once hoped would be his successor. and there, right in the center, in the pink jacket, rupert murdoch's wife, who played a surprising role when a heckler with a pie tried to attack her husband and she moved in. it is hard not to see what happened today as a kind of shakespearean drama, and jeffrey kofman was there watching it all in london. jeffrey, good evening. >> reporter: and good evening to you, diane. that's right. it was a very public family drama. a dynasty given a chance to salvage its reputation and scrambling to save itself in destruction. murdoch and his son couldn't stop apologizing throughout the afternoon. b
: the presidentnt continued to push for a big, painful deficit reduction package. >> we have a unique opportunity to do something big. >> reporter: and for the first time publicly, he detailed a specific, possible cut to a popular entitlement program. can you tell us one structural reform that you are willing to make to one of these entitlement programs that would have a major impact on the deficit? >> i've said that means testing on medicare. meaning, people like myself, you can envision a situation where, for somebody in my position, me having to pay a little bit more on premiums or copays or things like that would be appropriate. and again, that could make a difference. >> reporter: even with the suggestion, negotiations are at an impasse. house republicans are refusing to increase any taxes and insist the president is not serious about cuts. >> we asked the president to lead. we asked him to put forward a plan, not a speech, a real plan. and he hasn't. we will. >> reporter: the race is on to figure out a way to raise the debt ceiling without an agreement to reduce the deficit. and what happen
at the squabbling politicians letting the debt deadline take the economy to the brink. and one big message was delivered today. the markets, the dow dropped almost 100 points, as worried investors pulled out. they're watching that clock, you see, right there, ticking down to the august 2nd deadline for a debt deal. and in another scramble for safety, people are rushing to invest in gold. prices up as never seen before. here's abc's john berman. >> reporter: the partisanship, politicking and lack of progress in washington might already be taking a toll on your personal bank account and 40101 the stock drop today -- the first sign investors are saying, "we're mad as hell, and we're not going to take it anymore." >> the impatience and frustration is clearly getting there. >> reporter: wall street has a way of voicing its displeasure, and it's downright ugly. remember september 2008 when congress failed to pass a bank bailout? stocks cratered, nearly 780 points that day. >> 3.5 million -- >> reporter: we are not there yet, but there are other unnerving signs -- call it a canary in a goldmine.
as they are attempting d dicit reduction, they should think big. and what they're talking about could affect millions and millions of americans. there's a lot of cutting going on at the white house these days. and the branches of this elm could be just the beginning. poth both president obama and the house speaker, john boehner, today pushed congressional leaders to reduce the deficit by up to $4 trillion over the next decade or so. but how to get there is the sticking point. the president wants both spending cuts and new taxes and revenue. >> everybody acknowledged that there's going to be pain involved politically on all sides. >> reporter: and that pain will trickle down. and how might you feel it? republicans want to cut hundreds of billions of dollars from entitlement programs, including medicaid for low income americans. and for seniors receiving medicare and social security. benefits could be reduced. particularly for wealthier seniors. serious pain for seniors and serious fears. >> without medicare, i would be in a wheelchair or dead. >> reporter: and democrats say no way. >> we do not suppor
h totables. discreet, little tubes packed with big relief. from the brand doctors recommend most by name. new preparation h totables. the anywhere preparation h. >>> and now, alzheimer's. what if we could prevent the disease in hundreds of thousands of people? well, today, a new call to action that says, start by changing seven things in our control. here's abc's linsey davis. >> reporter: could healthy living actually reduce your chances of developing alzheimer's? the researchers behind today's study believe it can. they've highlighted seven life factors they believe are linked to developing dementia. the two most important risk factors are depression and physical inactivity. they say just sitting on that sofa is one of the biggest risk factors for you developing alzheimer's. other risks? not surprisingly, smoking. if you have high blood pressure. if you're overweight or have diabetes, they believe your risk is greater. and, of course, the one that always sends us grabbing for the crossword puzzle. if you don't regularly s smulate your mind. the good news is that these are all t
, big and small, are relucucnt to hire new workers until they are convinced the economy is really turning around. right now, they are not. john owns two clothing stores in new york city. a typical small businessman. he employs a total of ten people. just about the national average. in the viciously circular logic of a weak economy, he says he's discouraged from hiring because other employers aren't hiring. >> i see no growth in employment. it doesn't bode well for growing my business. >> reporter: and he wants to see other signs of recovery before talking on any new workers. >> we have to see easier credit and more demand. >> reporter: then you would start hiring? >> then we would start hiring. >> reporter: do you see that coming any time soon? >> not at all. >> reporter: and i asked john what he wants washington to do, he said, persuade the banks to start lending more readily and more generally, do something about jobs. frustration that he, an employer, shares with millions of people who are looking for work. diane? >> well, ron, that's the issue that leads us to your washington
for their health and for the house. >> reporter: this scandal may not seem like a big deal from afar, but it's left the prime minist minister. and a report that shows murdoch deliberately tries to this wart a criminal investigation to the illegal activities here. >> isn't it time that we sent this non-tax paying murdoch from wednesday he came? >> reporter: the prime minister doesn't have to. murdoch boarded his private jet is afternoon to fly home to the u.s. no doubt happy to leave london and all the turbulence behind. jeffrey kofman, abc news, london. >> and questions tonight about where the controversy will go when he lands back here at home. >>> and still ahead here on "world news" this wednesday night, broken promises this evening. an entire town gathered and told that those propgsed pensions, we can't afford. so, now what? >>> and this comes as we look here for new solutions. this evening, the one thing you should ask your boss about tomorrow morning to keep your retirement dream alive. >>> and then later here on "world news," what would you do? or betteret what would you wife do after that n
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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